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In a statement released Friday by the College Football Playoff, the former Michigan football coach cited health issues in his decision to leave the committee, which picks the four FBS teams that will play for the national championship. This is a difficult decision because I have enjoyed my preparations and I have the greatest respect for the other committee members and the playoff itself, Carr said today in a statement. I regret that health issues will prevent me from executing the responsibilities expected of a committee member. Carr coached at Michigan from 1995 to 2007, and led the Wolverines to the 1997 national championship. A Michigan spokesman said Carrs health issues are not life-threatening, and that Carr is considering whether or not to have surgery following an injury he suffered earlier this year. If surgery required an extended recovery period, Carr did not want that time to take away from his responsibilities on the selection committee, which meets on a weekly basis beginning in October. Carr was to serve on the selection committee this year, for a three-year term. The College Football Playoff selection committee will have 12 members this season, and will issue its first rankings Nov. 1. Selection Day for the four-team playoff is Dec.

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Cloud Hospital ) about a project that examined acute response team (ART) calls regarding patients who had received procedural or conscious sedation 24 hours prior to the event. As Ms. Lange wrote in her article published in ADVANCE for Respiratory Care and Sleep Medicine, ” Culture of Safety Includes Capnography “: “We looked at patient monitoring practices in the outpatient procedural areas and we addressed the very real issue of too many alarms on the hospital patient floor. We also undertook a literature review for the project as we prepared to consider implementing capnography outside the operating room at our institution.” For the project, St. Cloud Hospital brought together a team of clinicians that included physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and pharmacists who represented different clinical areas like pain, sedation, endoscopy, and surgery. In this interview, Ms. Lange discussed 5 key learnings from this project: Key Learning #1 – Capnography Assists with Assessment of the Quality of Ventilation Ms. Lange said that their review of the relevant literature and their experience showed that monitoring with capnography is a valuable tool to assess the patient’s quality of ventilation: “We reviewed the literature and then budgeted through normal channels for approval for the equipment, and then worked closely with the surgical floor for the trial period. We found that the literature talked about CO2 monitoring was providing an earlier indicator of respiratory compromise before the patient became hypoxic. “So, even before oximetry would be a reading, CO2 monitoring provided that earlier indication. We found that it was official site recommended as a tool for procedural sedation. And during the recovery for sedation, we found that end tidal CO2 monitoring was recommended to assist with the quality of ventilation. It was a standard of care for anesthesia interview skills for marketing jobs for a number of years for intubated and mechanically vented patients, and it’s also in the ACLS guidelines for cardiopulmonary arrest management.” Key Learning #2 – Monitor Patients Continuously, Not Intermittently To be effective, capnography monitoring should be done continuously have a peek here and not intermittently, said Ms.

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